GOLDEN FLAMINGOS, Uncategorized

Golden Flamingo Winners 2019

Best Picture


Mission: Impossible – Fallout

Best Film


Roma

Best Director (tie)


Alfonso Cuaron – Roma

and

Chloe Zhao – The Rider

Best Actress


Yalitza Aparicio – Roma

Best Actor


Bradley Cooper – A Star Is Born

Best Supporting Actress


Michelle Yeoh – Crazy Rich Asians

Best Supporting Actor (tie)


Brian Tyree Henry – If Beale Street Could Talk

and

Sam Elliott – A Star Is Born

Best Scene Stealer


Jesse Plemons – Game Night

Best Ensemble


Game Night

Best Performance in a Unique Role


Raffey Cassidy – Vox Lux

Best Editing


Searching

Best Cinematography


Roma

Best Music


Cold War

Best Animated Film


Ralph Breaks the Internet

Best Sound


First Man

Best Visual Effects


First Man

Best Production Design


Cold War

Best Costume Design


Vice

Best Screenplay


Cold War

Best Scene


“The Mortal Remains” in The Ballad of Buster Scruggs

Best Documentary


Minding the Gap

Worst Picture


At Eternity’s Gate

Best Animal (Non-Speaking)


Raccoon – Incredibles 2

Best Animal (Speaking)


Paddington the Bear – Paddington 2

Best Movies of the Past


Apocalypse Now • Country Strong • Dangal • Mistaken for Strangers • Raiders of the Lost Ark • The Sound of Music

Notes:

Wins: Roma (4), Cold War (3), A Star Is Born (2), Game Night (2), First Man (2)

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GOLDEN FLAMINGOS, Uncategorized

Golden Flamingo Nominations 2019

NEW YORK – As another year in cinema has concluded, it’s time again for the grandest of honors in film, the Golden Flamingos. Early this morning, the nomination announcements got off to a rough start when the scheduled presenters, Taraji P. Henson and Ray Romano, failed to show up for the broadcast. Nevertheless, the many nominations were revealed in a phone size digital screen in Times Square.

Reactions online were mixed. Many ‘Flamingo purists’ tweeted their outrage concerning the addition of several new categories. While there were some positive tweets celebrating the much deserved nominations for Bradley Cooper (Directing for A Star is Born) and Horatio the Racing Duck (Animal Non-Speaking for The Favourite).

This year’s show will once again air during the commercials of the Oscars, (the most valuable time in the telecast). Thanks to the outcry from past Golden Flamingo winners and fans alike, the Oscars backed off from airing some of the biggest awards simultaneously as the flamingos.

With the show in rehearsals, sources close to the producers are reporting that this year there will be no host. After Betty White was announced as host, a bevy of past offensive tweets resurfaced. Coupled with the trending hashtag #GoldenFlamingosSoWhite, the producers had no choice but to move in a different direction. Despite Ellen DeGeneres’s many phone calls in support of the comedian Kevin Hart getting the gig after he walked away from hosting the Oscars, the Golden Flamingos ultimately decided to go without a host.

Without further ado, here are the nominees:

Best Film


  • Cold War
  • First Man
  • Roma
  • The Rider
  • Vox Lux

Best Picture


  • A Head Full Of Dreams
  • Cold War
  • Crazy Rich Asians
  • Mission: Impossible – Fallout
  • Roma

Best Director


  • Alfonso Cuaron ~ Roma
  • Barry Jenkins ~ If Beale Street Could Talk
  • Bradley Cooper ~ A Star Is Born
  • Chloe Zhao ~ The Rider
  • Christopher McQuarrie ~ Mission: Impossible – Fallout
  • Damien Chazelle ~ First Man
  • Pawel Pawlikowski ~ Cold War

Best Actress


  • Constance Wu ~ Crazy Rich Asians
  • Elsie Fisher ~ Eigth Grade
  • Joanna Kulig ~ Cold War
  • Lady Gaga ~ A Star is Born
  • Saoirse Ronan ~ Mary Queen of Scots
  • Thomasin Harcourt Mckenzie ~ Leave No Trace
  • Yalitza Aparicio ~ Roma

Best Actor


  • Brady Jandreau ~ The Rider
  • Bradley Cooper ~ A Star Is Born
  • Christian Bale ~ Vice
  • Stephan James ~ If Beale Street Could Talk
  • Ryan Gosling ~ First Man
  • Tomasz Kot ~ Cold War
  • Tom Cruise ~ Mission: Impossible – Fallout

Best Supporting Actress


  • Gemma Chan ~ Crazy Rich Asians
  • Margot Robbie ~ Mary Queen of Scots
  • Marina de Tavira ~ Roma
  • Michelle Yeoh ~ Crazy Rich Asians
  • Olivia Colman ~ The Favourite
  • Rebecca Ferguson ~ Mission: Impossible – Fallout
  • Regina King ~ If Beale Street Could Talk

Best Supporting Actor


  • Brian Tyree Henry ~ If Beale Street Could Talk
  • Jason Clarke ~ First Man
  • Mahershala Ali ~ Green Book
  • Sam Elliott ~ A Star Is Born
  • Sam Rockwell ~ Vice
  • Timotheé Chalamet ~ Beautiful Boy
  • Ving Rhames ~ Mission: Impossible – Fallout

Best Scene Stealer


  • Awkwafina ~ Crazy Rich Asians
  • Abby Ryder Fortson ~ Forever My Girl
  • Jack Jack ~ Incredibles 2
  • Jesse Plemons ~ Game Night
  • L3-37 (Voiced by Phoebe Waller-Bridge) ~ Solo: A Star Wars Story
  • Haley Lu Richardson ~ Support the Girls
  • Princesses ~ Ralph Breaks the Internet

Best Ensemble


  • Avengers: Infinity War
  • The Ballad of Buster Scruggs
  • Game Night
  • Mission: Impossible – Fallout
  • Widows
  • Vice

Best Performance in a Unique Role


  • Tom Waits – lead but in a vignette ~ The Ballad of Buster Scruggs
  • Anya Taylor-Joy and Olivia Cooke – performance reliant on each other ~ Thoroughbreds
  • Raffey Cassidy – Both the lead as young Natalie Portman and supporting as Portman’s daughter ~ Vox Lux
  • Dave Chappelle – significant appearance in an isolated part of the film ~ A Star is Born
  • Josh Brolin – motion capture ~ Avengers: Infinity War

Best Editing


  • If Beale Street Could Talk
  • First Man
  • Roma
  • Searching
  • Vice
  • Vox Lux

Best Cinematography


  • A Star Is Born
  • Cold War
  • If Beale Street Could Talk
  • Roma
  • The Rider

Best Music


  • A Star Is Born
  • Black Panther
  • Cold War
  • Creed II
  • First Man
  • Mary Poppins Returns

Best Animated Film


  • Incredibles 2
  • Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
  • Ralph Breaks the Internet

Best Sound


  • Annihilation
  • A Star Is Born
  • First Man
  • Mission: Impossible- Fallout
  • Roma
  • Thoroughbreds

Best Visual Effects


  • Avengers: Infinity War
  • Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald
  • First Man
  • Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom
  • Mary Poppins Returns

Best Production Design


  • Cold War
  • Crazy Rich Asians
  • Mary Poppins Returns
  • Mary Queen of Scots
  • Vice

Best Costume Design


  • Crazy Rich Asians
  • Mary Poppins Returns
  • Mary Queen of Scots
  • The Favourite
  • Vice

Best Screenplay


  • Cold War
  • Crazy Rich Asians
  • Game Night
  • Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
  • The Ballad of Buster Scruggs
  • The Rider

Best Scene


  • Ally and Jackson in the parking lot in A Star is Born
  • Beach scene in Roma
  • Brady trains the horse in The Rider
  • Daniel Carty talks about prison in If Beale Street Could Talk
  • First steps on the moon in First Man
  • Difuse the bombs scene in Mission: Impossible – Fallout
  • Raccoon vs. Jack Jack in Incredibles 2
  • “The Mortal Remains” in The Ballad of Buster Scruggs
  • Wedding scene in Crazy Rich Asians

Best Documentary


  • A Head Full of Dreams
  • Basketball: A Love Story
  • Minding the Gap
  • The Zen Diaries of Garry Shandling
  • Wild Wild Country
  • Won’t You Be My Neighbor

Worst Picture


  • At Eternity’s Gate
  • Can You Ever Forgive Me?
  • First Reformed
  • Sorry To Bother You

Best Animal (Non-Speaking)


  • Horatio the Racing Duck ~ The Favourite
  • Raccoon ~ Incredibles 2
  • Sebastian the Dog ~ Game Night
  • Owl ~ The Ballad of Buster Scruggs
  • Rabbits ~ The Favourite
  • Zouwu ~ Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald

Best Animal (Speaking)


  • Chief the Dog ~ Isle of Dogs
  • Shamus the Dog ~ Mary Poppins Returns
  • Karathen ~ Aquaman
  • Paddington the Bear ~ Paddington 2
  • Winnie the Pooh ~ Christopher Robin
  • Eeyore the Donkey ~ Christopher Robin

Best Movies of the Past


  • Apocalypse Now
  • Country Strong
  • Dangal
  • Mistaken For Strangers
  • Raiders of the Lost Ark
  • The Sound of Music

Notes

The new categories Best Picture and Best Film divide the top films of the year into the favorite movies that the voter would rewatch (Picture) and the favorite movies that the voter admires most (Film).

Best Performance in a Unique Role provides recognition to acting that would not fit into the other categories.

The top nominated films of the year are: A Star is Born (9), Cold War (9), Crazy Rich Asians (9), First Man (9), Roma (9), If Beale Street Could Talk (7), Mission: Impossible – Fallout (7), The Rider (6), Vice (6), and Mary Poppins Returns (5).

Both Ryan Gosling and Bradley Cooper have received their record third nomination.

Rebecca Ferguson, Mahershala Ali, Saoirse Ronan, and Christian Bale all have the opportunity to get their record second Golden Flamingo win.

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GOLDEN FLAMINGOS, Uncategorized

Golden Flamingo Winners 2018

Best Picture


  • Logan Lucky

Best Director


  • Dee Rees ~ Mudbound

Best Actress


  • Saoirse Ronan ~ Lady Bird

Best Actor (tie)


  • Adam Driver ~ Star Wars: The Last Jedi

and

  • Christian Bale ~ Hostiles

Best Supporting Actress


  • Hong Chau ~ Downsizing

Best Supporting Actor (tie)


  • Rory Cochrane ~ Hostiles

and

  • Willem Dafoe ~ The Florida Project

Best Editing


  • Darkest Hour

Best Cinematography


  • The Florida Project

Best Music (tie)


  • Coco

and

  • Star Wars; The Last Jedi

Best Animated Film


  • Coco

Best Sound


  • Star Wars: The Last Jedi

Best Visual Effects


  • Star Wars: The Last Jedi

Best Production Design


  • Blade Runner 2049

Best Costume Design


  • The Shape of Water

Best Screenplay (tie)


  • Logan Lucky

and

  • Molly’s Game

Best Documentary


  • Spielberg

Worst Picture


  • Valerian

Best Animal


  • Dante the Dog ~ Coco

Best Car


  • Cruz Ramirez ~ Cars 3

 

TOTALS

4 – Star Wars: The Last Jedi*

3 – Coco

2 – The Florida Project

2 – Hostiles

2 – Logan Lucky

*Ties “Mad Max: Fury Road” for most Golden Flamingo wins by a single film

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Three Popped Corns, Uncategorized

I Just Watched This Movie: “Silence”

Coming-Of-Age. A genre of film, coming-of-age shows the maturation and education of a young character aimed to connect with an audience who’s all been through it before. Taking place a long time ago in a country far away, “Silence” is a coming-of-age story about a young priest who learns the age-old lesson: Christianity doesn’t take root in Japan. An odd period piece that combines the origin story of Qui-Gon Jinn (Liam Neeson) and Kylo Ren (Adam Driver), “Silence” shows men torn between the light and the dark side, and having to decide whether to believe in Christ or the Force. A bearded and confused Andrew Garfield plays the main character who bears a striking resemblance to the white European representation of Jesus. Garfield puts on a perfect Portuguese-English accent that’s unfortunately hampered by an apparent tongue injury that occurred prior to the shoot. Over the course of the film Garfield and his friend? brother? cousin? partner? roommate? take a gap year to travel around Japan and hear people’s sins. Unfortunately, their trip goes all wrong when the government decides to imprison them and kill/torture all of their new friends. That’s when they learn what it really means to be a grown up Jesuit priest.

Religion. Religion is all about questions.Lots of questions. What is a Chruch? Who can go inside? Who is God? Who is God’s immediate family? Where is God right now? Can I talk to him? Did he watch this movie too? Any good film about religion needs questions, and this movie had an abundance. The main character wrestles with many questions about his own faith and God’s role in the horrors he’s witnessing. The movie raises a lot of questions for the viewer too. Is it wrong to force these people to believe a new religion that allows Jesuit priests to be treated like royalty among the Japanese peasants? or is wrong that the Japanese government brutally kills so many of these believers? Characters are forced to step bare footed and trample on an image of Jesus to renounce their faith, does this action doom them to hell, or will God understand their plight? What are the answers to these questions? The movie really doesn’t provide any. Should a movie answer the questions it presents? Should the audience deal with leaving the theater unsatisfied? Who knows?

Auteur. An auteur is a film director that transcends the title of director and reaches a level where they take all of the credit for a film. Martin Scorsese (“New York Gangster Movie,” “Other New York Gangster Movie,” and “Boston Gangster Movie”) directs his latest masterpiece that’s being praised by literally every critic and has reminded everyone yet again why he is an auteur. It’s clear that Scorsese had complete control of his craft on his long awaited film that reflects his personal beliefs and experiences that only he could tell after having been a priest in Japan for most of his childhood. A sign of Scorsese’s mastering of the craft would be the way he uses pacing. Normally in a film, scenes of great importance are allowed to be drawn out to give the audience time to process and feel the depth of the drama. Scorsese knows this and maximizes it. Every scene in Silence is treated with this technique giving the film a run time that any auteur would be proud of.

A long movie that requires endurance and an undying appreciation for Scorsese, I found “Silence” to be unsatisfying and a bit painful to watch. With that being said, a whole lot of critics liked it so what do I know? I give it three popped corns.screen-shot-2014-10-04-at-3-50-30-pm

 

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Two Popped Corns, Uncategorized

I Just Watched This Movie; “Jason Bourne”

Equipment. Shooting a movie requires various tools, such as a camera, a sound recorder, and lights. Equipment doesn’t simply appear on set, it must be rented. Major studio films usually have the budget to rent all the equipment they need, especially the essentials. That’s why it was so surprising that the producers of “Jason Bourne” forgot to rent a tripod or steadicam. This mistake was not the first time. The same mistake has been made on the productions of all the Bourne films. You’d think that someone would learn or get fired. This mistake goes right up there with Terrence Malick forgetting to rent lights, and Michel Hazanavicius forgetting to rent a sound recorder for “The Artist.”

Retaining Cast. Sequels should give an audience more of the characters that they’ve fallen in love with. These characters are tied to the actors that play them, which is why it is so important to retain cast members. Some series have issues with this. The James Bond series, for example, has had an extremely difficult time getting Sean Connery back for the films and thus has resorted to many other actors. If there’s one thing that the Bourne series has done well, it’s keeping Matt Damon in the films. Julia Stiles returns alongside Damon in her role as ex CIA analyst Nicky Parsons, and the pair return to their long term staring contest. You’ll have to see the film to find out who wins. Along with them, Tommy Lee Jones joined the film to reprise his role from “The Fugitive.” The filmmakers even cast all the same extras from the past film’s crowded London scenes for this film’s crowded London scenes.

Information. In the spy genre, the characters are always in search of information on how events are linked, who is related to who, and what evil plot must be stopped. “Jason Bourne” creatively fulfills this genre requirement by presenting all information on computer screens. In the digital age, it makes sense that all of the characters backstory and secrets would be available in a file on some CIA computer, or in the results of a google search. Some might say it’s not cinematic to show computer screens for more than half of the film. Or to have actors share emotional scenes with computers. But presenting exposition and plot points this way is very efficient and the audience can find a way to enjoy it.

There aren’t many Bourne films out there, but this is definitely one of them. While it may not have been as well written or exciting as the past films, it’s an action movie with Matt Damon. I give it two popped corns.

Screen Shot 2014-10-04 at 3.49.42 PM

 

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Uncategorized, Zero Popped Corns

I Just Watched This Movie; “Interstellar”

Sequels. They’re extremely common in the film industry. When people like a movie, sequels are often a profitable way to give the audience more of what they loved. Successful director/producer/writer/physicist Christopher Nolan understands the value of a sequel, and with “Interstellar,” attempted to replicate the critical success of last year’s hit “Gravity.” Following new characters, many years after the events of “Gravity,” Nolan explores the view of Earth from space, flying in space, and the struggle to find gravity in space.  Knowing that you must modify the original, Nolan’s depiction of space is much much larger, as well as significantly quieter. Additionally, there was a larger cast. While the plot didn’t have much to do with “Gravity” in general, Nolan seemed to force “Gravity” into the film all the time. For example, early in the film, a book falls off a shelf, and the character says that “Gravity” did it. I found blaming that occurrence on the previous film was unnecessary.

Exposition. In films with a lot of back story, or a complex premise, or advanced physics, or philosophical theories, or all of those like “Interstellar,” it is necessary to inform the audience as to what is going on. An effective and traditional way of doing this, is through dialogue. Nolan expertly cast Matthew McConaughey as the lead knowing how well he reads exposition. Starring in “True Detective” last year, McConaughey proved that he could explain complex and confusing ideas and background information in a way that people could easily understand. During “Interstellar,” McConaughey’s familiar voice and accent guided us through a universe of quantum theories and multiple dimensions. If it ever became confusing to understand the science behind a scene, it was comforting to know that the astronaut farmer on-screen knew exactly what he was talking about.

Experience. Most movies strive to be called an experience. In my opinion, they are films that an audience goes out to see in small theater, or maybe just in their living room. They have a slow plot and subtle performances. When you finish these movies, you feel like you’ve just experienced something similar to what you experience in your everyday life. “Interstellar” has been falsely called an “experience” by many of my film reviewing peers.”Interstellar” was way too grand and out-of-this-world, to be classified as an experience. Watching this movie in IMAX, I felt like I was trying to save all of humanity and my mission led me across galaxies. But that’s nowhere close to my normal everyday activities. There’s got to be a better way to describe the action of watching “Interstellar” and feeling the many emotions that it evokes because it is certainly is not an “incredible movie going ‘experience’.”

Perhaps overly ambitious at times, “Interstellar” is an epic film of size and scope that contains all the suspense and moving moments that one would expect from Christopher Nolan. I give it zero popped corns.

Screen Shot 2014-10-04 at 3.48.46 PM

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