GOLDEN FLAMINGOS, Uncategorized

Golden Flamingo Winners 2019

Best Picture


Mission: Impossible – Fallout

Best Film


Roma

Best Director (tie)


Alfonso Cuaron – Roma

and

Chloe Zhao – The Rider

Best Actress


Yalitza Aparicio – Roma

Best Actor


Bradley Cooper – A Star Is Born

Best Supporting Actress


Michelle Yeoh – Crazy Rich Asians

Best Supporting Actor (tie)


Brian Tyree Henry – If Beale Street Could Talk

and

Sam Elliott – A Star Is Born

Best Scene Stealer


Jesse Plemons – Game Night

Best Ensemble


Game Night

Best Performance in a Unique Role


Raffey Cassidy – Vox Lux

Best Editing


Searching

Best Cinematography


Roma

Best Music


Cold War

Best Animated Film


Ralph Breaks the Internet

Best Sound


First Man

Best Visual Effects


First Man

Best Production Design


Cold War

Best Costume Design


Vice

Best Screenplay


Cold War

Best Scene


“The Mortal Remains” in The Ballad of Buster Scruggs

Best Documentary


Minding the Gap

Worst Picture


At Eternity’s Gate

Best Animal (Non-Speaking)


Raccoon – Incredibles 2

Best Animal (Speaking)


Paddington the Bear – Paddington 2

Best Movies of the Past


Apocalypse Now • Country Strong • Dangal • Mistaken for Strangers • Raiders of the Lost Ark • The Sound of Music

Notes:

Wins: Roma (4), Cold War (3), A Star Is Born (2), Game Night (2), First Man (2)

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GOLDEN FLAMINGOS, Uncategorized

Golden Flamingo Nominations 2019

NEW YORK – As another year in cinema has concluded, it’s time again for the grandest of honors in film, the Golden Flamingos. Early this morning, the nomination announcements got off to a rough start when the scheduled presenters, Taraji P. Henson and Ray Romano, failed to show up for the broadcast. Nevertheless, the many nominations were revealed in a phone size digital screen in Times Square.

Reactions online were mixed. Many ‘Flamingo purists’ tweeted their outrage concerning the addition of several new categories. While there were some positive tweets celebrating the much deserved nominations for Bradley Cooper (Directing for A Star is Born) and Horatio the Racing Duck (Animal Non-Speaking for The Favourite).

This year’s show will once again air during the commercials of the Oscars, (the most valuable time in the telecast). Thanks to the outcry from past Golden Flamingo winners and fans alike, the Oscars backed off from airing some of the biggest awards simultaneously as the flamingos.

With the show in rehearsals, sources close to the producers are reporting that this year there will be no host. After Betty White was announced as host, a bevy of past offensive tweets resurfaced. Coupled with the trending hashtag #GoldenFlamingosSoWhite, the producers had no choice but to move in a different direction. Despite Ellen DeGeneres’s many phone calls in support of the comedian Kevin Hart getting the gig after he walked away from hosting the Oscars, the Golden Flamingos ultimately decided to go without a host.

Without further ado, here are the nominees:

Best Film


  • Cold War
  • First Man
  • Roma
  • The Rider
  • Vox Lux

Best Picture


  • A Head Full Of Dreams
  • Cold War
  • Crazy Rich Asians
  • Mission: Impossible – Fallout
  • Roma

Best Director


  • Alfonso Cuaron ~ Roma
  • Barry Jenkins ~ If Beale Street Could Talk
  • Bradley Cooper ~ A Star Is Born
  • Chloe Zhao ~ The Rider
  • Christopher McQuarrie ~ Mission: Impossible – Fallout
  • Damien Chazelle ~ First Man
  • Pawel Pawlikowski ~ Cold War

Best Actress


  • Constance Wu ~ Crazy Rich Asians
  • Elsie Fisher ~ Eigth Grade
  • Joanna Kulig ~ Cold War
  • Lady Gaga ~ A Star is Born
  • Saoirse Ronan ~ Mary Queen of Scots
  • Thomasin Harcourt Mckenzie ~ Leave No Trace
  • Yalitza Aparicio ~ Roma

Best Actor


  • Brady Jandreau ~ The Rider
  • Bradley Cooper ~ A Star Is Born
  • Christian Bale ~ Vice
  • Stephan James ~ If Beale Street Could Talk
  • Ryan Gosling ~ First Man
  • Tomasz Kot ~ Cold War
  • Tom Cruise ~ Mission: Impossible – Fallout

Best Supporting Actress


  • Gemma Chan ~ Crazy Rich Asians
  • Margot Robbie ~ Mary Queen of Scots
  • Marina de Tavira ~ Roma
  • Michelle Yeoh ~ Crazy Rich Asians
  • Olivia Colman ~ The Favourite
  • Rebecca Ferguson ~ Mission: Impossible – Fallout
  • Regina King ~ If Beale Street Could Talk

Best Supporting Actor


  • Brian Tyree Henry ~ If Beale Street Could Talk
  • Jason Clarke ~ First Man
  • Mahershala Ali ~ Green Book
  • Sam Elliott ~ A Star Is Born
  • Sam Rockwell ~ Vice
  • Timotheé Chalamet ~ Beautiful Boy
  • Ving Rhames ~ Mission: Impossible – Fallout

Best Scene Stealer


  • Awkwafina ~ Crazy Rich Asians
  • Abby Ryder Fortson ~ Forever My Girl
  • Jack Jack ~ Incredibles 2
  • Jesse Plemons ~ Game Night
  • L3-37 (Voiced by Phoebe Waller-Bridge) ~ Solo: A Star Wars Story
  • Haley Lu Richardson ~ Support the Girls
  • Princesses ~ Ralph Breaks the Internet

Best Ensemble


  • Avengers: Infinity War
  • The Ballad of Buster Scruggs
  • Game Night
  • Mission: Impossible – Fallout
  • Widows
  • Vice

Best Performance in a Unique Role


  • Tom Waits – lead but in a vignette ~ The Ballad of Buster Scruggs
  • Anya Taylor-Joy and Olivia Cooke – performance reliant on each other ~ Thoroughbreds
  • Raffey Cassidy – Both the lead as young Natalie Portman and supporting as Portman’s daughter ~ Vox Lux
  • Dave Chappelle – significant appearance in an isolated part of the film ~ A Star is Born
  • Josh Brolin – motion capture ~ Avengers: Infinity War

Best Editing


  • If Beale Street Could Talk
  • First Man
  • Roma
  • Searching
  • Vice
  • Vox Lux

Best Cinematography


  • A Star Is Born
  • Cold War
  • If Beale Street Could Talk
  • Roma
  • The Rider

Best Music


  • A Star Is Born
  • Black Panther
  • Cold War
  • Creed II
  • First Man
  • Mary Poppins Returns

Best Animated Film


  • Incredibles 2
  • Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
  • Ralph Breaks the Internet

Best Sound


  • Annihilation
  • A Star Is Born
  • First Man
  • Mission: Impossible- Fallout
  • Roma
  • Thoroughbreds

Best Visual Effects


  • Avengers: Infinity War
  • Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald
  • First Man
  • Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom
  • Mary Poppins Returns

Best Production Design


  • Cold War
  • Crazy Rich Asians
  • Mary Poppins Returns
  • Mary Queen of Scots
  • Vice

Best Costume Design


  • Crazy Rich Asians
  • Mary Poppins Returns
  • Mary Queen of Scots
  • The Favourite
  • Vice

Best Screenplay


  • Cold War
  • Crazy Rich Asians
  • Game Night
  • Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
  • The Ballad of Buster Scruggs
  • The Rider

Best Scene


  • Ally and Jackson in the parking lot in A Star is Born
  • Beach scene in Roma
  • Brady trains the horse in The Rider
  • Daniel Carty talks about prison in If Beale Street Could Talk
  • First steps on the moon in First Man
  • Difuse the bombs scene in Mission: Impossible – Fallout
  • Raccoon vs. Jack Jack in Incredibles 2
  • “The Mortal Remains” in The Ballad of Buster Scruggs
  • Wedding scene in Crazy Rich Asians

Best Documentary


  • A Head Full of Dreams
  • Basketball: A Love Story
  • Minding the Gap
  • The Zen Diaries of Garry Shandling
  • Wild Wild Country
  • Won’t You Be My Neighbor

Worst Picture


  • At Eternity’s Gate
  • Can You Ever Forgive Me?
  • First Reformed
  • Sorry To Bother You

Best Animal (Non-Speaking)


  • Horatio the Racing Duck ~ The Favourite
  • Raccoon ~ Incredibles 2
  • Sebastian the Dog ~ Game Night
  • Owl ~ The Ballad of Buster Scruggs
  • Rabbits ~ The Favourite
  • Zouwu ~ Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald

Best Animal (Speaking)


  • Chief the Dog ~ Isle of Dogs
  • Shamus the Dog ~ Mary Poppins Returns
  • Karathen ~ Aquaman
  • Paddington the Bear ~ Paddington 2
  • Winnie the Pooh ~ Christopher Robin
  • Eeyore the Donkey ~ Christopher Robin

Best Movies of the Past


  • Apocalypse Now
  • Country Strong
  • Dangal
  • Mistaken For Strangers
  • Raiders of the Lost Ark
  • The Sound of Music

Notes

The new categories Best Picture and Best Film divide the top films of the year into the favorite movies that the voter would rewatch (Picture) and the favorite movies that the voter admires most (Film).

Best Performance in a Unique Role provides recognition to acting that would not fit into the other categories.

The top nominated films of the year are: A Star is Born (9), Cold War (9), Crazy Rich Asians (9), First Man (9), Roma (9), If Beale Street Could Talk (7), Mission: Impossible – Fallout (7), The Rider (6), Vice (6), and Mary Poppins Returns (5).

Both Ryan Gosling and Bradley Cooper have received their record third nomination.

Rebecca Ferguson, Mahershala Ali, Saoirse Ronan, and Christian Bale all have the opportunity to get their record second Golden Flamingo win.

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Zero Popped Corns

I Just Watched This Movie; “Avengers: Infinity War”

***SPOILERS***

Antagonists. The greatest of heroes are measured by the villains that they defeat. Most modern superhero movies forget this and have their protagonists face off against a singular villain with super strength, a sky beam, and a mindless army. If you study all of the battles from the previous 18 films, you’ll find that the most exciting battles are actually conflicts within the Avengers team. It takes a meticulous re-watch to even identify a villain in “Captain America: Civil War.” Thankfully, Marvel discovered this flaw, and created the perfect protagonist-antagonist conflict in the new movie, “Avengers: Infinity War.” The film follows Thanos (Josh Brolin), a purple hulk who chooses to wear only one gauntlet (did he lose the other one? or is it a Michael Jackson thing?). Realizing the necessity for an objective way to control overpopulation, Thanos comes up with the most efficient solution: halve the population in a painless, unbiased, and instant act. As simple as his plan seems, he must face off against several adversaries. These villains are actually the Avengers. That’s right, Marvel has brilliantly shown us the full power of the Avengers through the 42 previous movies just so that we understand how powerful our hero Thanos is when he fights them. By the way, did anyone know that Josh Brolin was that big? He must be at least 8ft tall!

Money. Movies can’t get made without money. Everyone on set needs to get paid, from the stars to the unpaid PAs. When a movie is in preproduction, funds are raised, investors are brought in, and a budget is created. For movies in the Marvel franchise, funding is not a problem. The movies are consistently lucrative and a fairly safe investment. However, while audiences didn’t seem to be fatigued from the Marvel superhero format after the previous 71 films, investors seemed to be. This film was underfunded and it showed. Early on, a fight scene takes place in New York City. The fight starts in a street, but quickly moves to Washington Square Park. If Marvel had a real budget, that scene would have been in a better park like Central Park, or at the very least Tompkins Square Park. Even worse, they obviously recycled sets from “Black Panther.”  Even the effects suffered. Vision (Paul Bettany) was rarely in full make-up which gave the false feeling that he was a person, and not just Siri come to life. Hulk as well was absent in most of the film because they couldn’t afford the VFX. But perhaps the worst part, was that towards the end, the VFX artists were shut down mid render and so a bunch of characters just disappear.

Relatability. When we watch a film, we enter into the story and the reality in which it takes place. This can be jarring for an audience if there is not an entry point that allows them to relate and understand the world. For this reason, superhero movies often include non-heroes that the audience can identify with. While all 112 Marvel movies have done this, unfortunately, the non-hero character does not exist in Infinity War. Every character has some sort of super power. It makes you wonder; where are the normal humans like Nick Fury, Jane Foster, or Hawkeye? Furthermore, as the Earth is attacked, where are the militaries? It seems awfully haughty of the Avengers to not ask for the help of the other 7 billion people. Practicality aside, the movie is just hard to understand. Like, I don’t have super strength, and I don’t see any characters without super strength, so how am I supposed to understand just how strong Thanos, or Thor, or Captain America are? Like they could all be weak compared to a normal human and we would never know. And how can we understand how these stones work without super intelligence? Usually they need to explains how things work to some average human side kick, but without one, we’ll never know basic answers to questions like: Why can’t the infinity stones create enough resources to support a larger population? Why does everyone across the galaxy speak english when there are thousands of languages on the planet Earth alone? Why is Gamora?

Over the course of the past 1200 Marvel films, audiences have come to know the formula of these movies. It’s hard to ask for too big of a change when the standard works, but “Avengers: Infinity War” does just enough to improve on its action, humor, characterization, and structure to create a fresh and compelling experience. I should note that this rating is contingent on viewing the film in a full theater; I give it zero popped corns!

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GOLDEN FLAMINGOS, Uncategorized

Golden Flamingo Winners 2018

Best Picture


  • Logan Lucky

Best Director


  • Dee Rees ~ Mudbound

Best Actress


  • Saoirse Ronan ~ Lady Bird

Best Actor (tie)


  • Adam Driver ~ Star Wars: The Last Jedi

and

  • Christian Bale ~ Hostiles

Best Supporting Actress


  • Hong Chau ~ Downsizing

Best Supporting Actor (tie)


  • Rory Cochrane ~ Hostiles

and

  • Willem Dafoe ~ The Florida Project

Best Editing


  • Darkest Hour

Best Cinematography


  • The Florida Project

Best Music (tie)


  • Coco

and

  • Star Wars; The Last Jedi

Best Animated Film


  • Coco

Best Sound


  • Star Wars: The Last Jedi

Best Visual Effects


  • Star Wars: The Last Jedi

Best Production Design


  • Blade Runner 2049

Best Costume Design


  • The Shape of Water

Best Screenplay (tie)


  • Logan Lucky

and

  • Molly’s Game

Best Documentary


  • Spielberg

Worst Picture


  • Valerian

Best Animal


  • Dante the Dog ~ Coco

Best Car


  • Cruz Ramirez ~ Cars 3

 

TOTALS

4 – Star Wars: The Last Jedi*

3 – Coco

2 – The Florida Project

2 – Hostiles

2 – Logan Lucky

*Ties “Mad Max: Fury Road” for most Golden Flamingo wins by a single film

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GOLDEN FLAMINGOS

Golden Flamingo Nominations 2018

NEW YORK – As the movie award season comes to a close, it’s time for the least prestigious awards. Based every year on a single voter’s subjective opinion, the “Golden Flamingos” highlight some of the best films and performances of the year. In it’s fourth year, the Flamingo nominees were announced at 2PM ET yesterday in Brooklyn, NY. Those in attendance shrugged, nodded, and generally responded with an “awesome.”  Fan favorite category “Best Animal” caused quite a buzz as both fan favorites Dante the Dog from “Coco” and Porg from “Star Wars” were nominated. Those in attendance were surprised by the new category introduced this year “Best Car.” Both Batmobile and Lego Batmobile face the stiff competition from “Cars 3” and “The Fate of the Furious.”

Before reading the list of nominees, it’s important to refresh on the voting process of these awards. Movie’s qualify for awards when they are viewed by the sole voter. The sole voter then breaks the films and performances into tiers for each category. The top tier is than taken as the nominees, and a winner is selected based purely on the sole voter’s opinion. All of this is thoroughly documented on the sole voter’s blog which averages 13 views per post. Without further ado, here are the nominees…

Best Picture


  • Gifted
  • Hostiles
  • Lady Bird
  • Logan Lucky
  • Mudbound
  • Star Wars: The Last Jedi

Best Director


  • Dee Rees ~ Mudbound
  • Greta Gerwig ~ Lady Bird
  • Joe Wright ~ Darkest Hour
  • Scott Cooper ~ Hostiles
  • Sean Baker ~ The Florida Project

Best Actress


  • Daisy Ridley ~ Star Wars: The Last Jedi
  • Danielle MacDonald ~ Patti Cake$
  • Jessica Chastain  ~ Molly’s Game
  • Meryl Streep ~ The Post
  • Saoirse Ronan ~ Lady Bird
  • Vicky Krieps ~ Phantom Thread

Best Actor


  • Adam Driver ~ Star Wars: The Last Jedi
  • Christian Bale ~ Hostiles
  • David Oyelowow ~ A United Kingdom
  • Gary Oldman ~ Darkest Hour
  • Ryan Gosling ~ Blade Runner 2049
  • Timotheé Chalamet ~ Call Me By Your Name

Best Supporting Actress


  • Carey Mulligan ~ Mudbound
  • Hong Chau ~ Downsizing
  • Laurie Metcalf ~ Lady Bird
  • Mary J. Blige ~ Mudbound
  • McKenna Grace ~ Gifted
  • Rosamund Pike ~ Hostiles

Best Supporting Actor


  • Jason Mitchell ~ Mudbound
  • Rob Morgan ~ Mudbound
  • Romain Duris ~ All The Money In The World
  • Rory Cochrane ~ Hostiles
  • Sam Rockwell ~ Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
  • Willem Dafoe ~ The Florida Project

Best Editing


  • Call Me By Your Name
  • Darkest Hour
  • Logan Lucky
  • Molly’s Game
  • Star Wars: The Last Jedi

Best Cinematography


  • Blade Runner 2049
  • Hostiles
  • Logan
  • Mudbound
  • The Florida Project

Best Music


  • Atomic Blonde
  • Call Me By Your Name
  • Coco
  • Patti Cake$
  • Star Wars; The Last Jedi
  • The Greatest Showman

Best Animated Film


  • Cars 3
  • Coco
  • The Lego Batman Movie

Best Sound


  • Blade Runner 2049
  • Dunkirk
  • Hostiles
  • Star Wars: The Last Jedi
  • The Florida Project

Best Visual Effects


  • Blade Runner 2049
  • Kingsman: The Golden Circle
  • Star Wars: The Last Jedi
  • Thor: Ragnarok
  • Valerian

Best Production Design


  • Blade Runner 2049
  • Dunkirk
  • Logan Lucky
  • Mudbound
  • Star Wars: The Last Jedi
  • The Shape of Water

Best Costume Design


  • Hostiles
  • Kingsman: The Golden Circle
  • Star Wars: The Last Jedi
  • The Shape of Water
  • Thor: Ragnarok

Best Screenplay


  • Coco
  • Darkest Hour
  • Lady Bird
  • Logan Lucky
  • Molly’s Game
  • Mudbound

Best Documentary


  • An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth To Power
  • Icarus
  • The Genius and the Opera Singer
  • Spielberg

Worst Picture


  • Sharknado 5: Global Swarming
  • The Greatest Showman
  • Valerian

Best Animal


  • Dante the Dog ~ Coco
  • Deckard’s Dog ~ Blade Runner 2049
  • Felipe the Horse ~ Beauty and the Beast
  • Fred the One-Eyed Cat ~ Gifted
  • Okja the Super-Pig ~ Okja
  • Porg ~ Star Wars: The Last Jedi

Best Car


  • Batmobile ~ Justice League
  • Cruz Ramirez ~ Cars 3
  • Dodge Ice Charger (driven by Dom Toretto) ~ The Fate of the Furious
  • Flying Car (driven by Officer K) ~ Blade Runner 2049
  • Lego Batmobile ~ The Lego Batman Movie
  • Whichever Car that Baby’s Driving ~ Baby Driver
  • 2016 Ford Shelby GT350 (driven by Mellie Logan) ~ Logan Lucky

Notes

This is the second nomination for Rosamund Pike*, Meryl Streep*, David Oyelowow*, Carey Mulligan, Daisy Ridley, Jessica Chastain, Ryan Gosling

*These actors have an opportunity to win their second Golden Flamingo. No individual has won multiple Golden Flamingos.

Nomination breakdown by film:

10 – Star Wars: The Last Jedi

9 – Mudbound

8 – Hostiles

7 – Blade Runner 2049

5 – Logan Lucky

5 – Lady Bird

4 – Darkest Hour

4 – The Florida Project

4 – Coco

3 – Molly’s Game

3 – Call Me By Your Name

3 – Gifted

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One Popped Corn, REVIEWS

I Just Watched This Movie; “The Post”

Casting. A cast can make or break a film. While it’s important that the actors fit the roles that they play, it is even more important that they deliver on the acting ability that got them the role in the first place. Meryl Streep. Tom Hanks. These are the names of two of the most talented actors of all time, but they aren’t always the best, as the new film “The Post” proves. It seems that the casting directors, with a Spielberg blank cheque, decided to just grab the first actors that came to mind. They should have known these overworked actors were due to phone one in. Meryl seemed to have no idea what the blocking was, opting to simply follow other actors around during scenes. Additionally, she was especially clumsy, dropping books, knocking over chairs, and stumbling over lines as if her character would be that nervous taking on the responsibilities of running a newspaper at a time when women were significantly less respected. Tom Hanks on the other hand, just seemed to have not learned the script. Often, he would improvise or just repeat the same first amendment preaching. And when he just couldn’t remember his lines, he would stare (as if a reporter would ever take a moment to contemplate whether to publish a significant but controversial, and potentially costly, article). In regards of the rest of the cast, there were several mistakes made. One, Bruce Greenwood was cast as former Secretary of Defense, Robert McNamara. Greenwood’s a great actor. The issue, though, is that he played McNamara’ s boss, John F Kennedy, in the film “JFK.” How can anyone separate his two performances to believe he’s either one of those people. Two, Bob Odenkirk and David Cross appear in the film together as fellow reporters. But they aren’t funny. Why cast the stars of the HBO sketch comedy “Mr. Show with Bob and David” if you don’t intend to let them perform sketches. And lastly, another reporter was played by Jessie Mueller (Broadway: “Beautiful: the Carole King Musical,” “Waitress”) but she was not given any musical numbers. So disappointing. This paragraph was too long- it’s the movies fault for having so much high profile talent.

Media. Thanks to the digital media age, we consume information in so many ways and at a rapid pace. This movie made me want to buy a newspaper though. You may be able to get a constant stream of news through Twitter, but can you feel a tweet? Can you hand a tweet to your friend? Can you cut out a Twitter clipping and post it on your wall (I mean a physical wall, not Facebook)? The answers are no. Online news just isn’t represented in it’s own physical form. Though, we do have personal printers so I guess we could print them to paper ourselves. Actually, newspapers seem to be useless nowadays. But this was still an interesting movie to see how journalists and publishers interact. Though, I guess that’s probably outdated too. I get all my news from random clever people, friends, and celebrities who post on social media. They all have different takes that are much more exciting than what journalists and publishers are willing to print. I mean, I learned this week that the U.S. President is, like, really smart. You aren’t gonna see any journalist writing that. Anyway, while I find the movie and it’s newspaper plotline to be outdated, maybe some people will find something relevant in the film.

Expectations. A great film matches the audiences expectations perfectly. It is jarring when a movie manipulates an audiences’ assumptions by presenting new and different information. When I see a trailer for a movie about the Pentagon Papers being published by the Washington Post, I want to see that happen in the movie. Thankfully, “The Post” is about just that. While they make some attempts to tease the audience that maybe the post won’t publish the top secret information, the movie never manipulates the audience to believe that the story will go any other way than the way it happened in real life. Thus, the stakes and suspense remain low, and the audience doesn’t have to worry or get invested too much. A nice and easy viewing experience.

While the acting and directing was as expected with the talented people involved, the straightforwardness and familiarity of the story prevented the film from going much deeper than a timely statement on the importance of the first amendment. I give the film one popped corn.

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REVIEWS, Zero Popped Corns

I Just Watched This Movie; “Darkest Hour”

Fresh Talent. Every great movie star had their start somewhere. Directors are always taking chances, casting relative unknowns with the hope that they will be the next big thing. The new film “Darkest Hour” takes the ultimate chance by choosing a total neophyte to play the lead role of Prime Minister Winston Churchill. The actor, Mr. Oldman, an obvious stage name reflecting his advanced age, may not have been recognizable to audiences, but he still brought a tremendous presence to the role. As an older, unattractive, heavy man it seems that Gary hit the jackpot with a role that fit his physical features perfectly. His performance was astounding as well, though he mumbled a bit too many of his lines. Another first time actor, Kristin Scott Thomas, proved herself to be just as, if not more talented than her notable twin brother Daniel Day Lewis. In a supporting yet significant role, veteran actress Lily James (“Cinderella”, “Baby Driver”, “Downton Abbey”) delivered a strong performance as well.

Duration. It’s important that movies are a reasonable length. It’s scientifically proven that humans cannot sit in a chair for longer that two hours and thirty minutes without either falling asleep or having to urinate, so movies are kept within this limit. However, some directors look to push their captive human audience to the limits. Christopher Nolan is one such director. His films have progressively increased in length through the Batman series up to “Interstellar.” He ultimately reached a breaking point, though, last year when his epic film about Dunkirk hit the mark of three and a half hours. At such a length, the theaters declined to show it, and he was forced to split the film into two separate movies. The 2nd Unit crew, led by Assistant Director Joe Wright, took on the responsibility of refining the fourth parallel plot about Dunkirk, the one focused on Churchill, into its own full feature. After seeing the 90 minute “Dunkirk” and this 120 minute “Darkest Hour,” I am beyond excited to watch the original “Nolan Director’s cut” once released on DVD.

Historical Accuracy. Often the biggest controversies surrounding historical dramas is the accuracy of the events and people shown. The film, “Darkest Hour,” deals with an extremely important event in world history; The Second World War. During the movie it struck me as odd that the United States was only mentioned once, and really had no role. Here the British Prime Minister was dealing with the end of Western Europe and the threat of invasion at the hands of the Nazis, and not a single American was there to help. Hundreds of thousands of soldiers from the allied forces were dying, and even more civilians were being killed, captured, and thrown in concentration camps, and yet the movie refused to show any American assistance. This made no sense to me. I mean, didn’t the USA win World War II? So we must have been involved from the beginning of the war, right? Oh well, the Brits rewriting history I guess. On a side note, I will say that the film was accurate in it’s depiction of the British parlement. They have a much better system than the American congress. We should have our two parties sit on separate sides in stadium seating and let them yell and throw blank sheets of paper at each other.

While “Darkest Hour” was filled with a lot of talking and speeches, the film kept up its energy not just with clever dialogue and engrossing performances, but also with adept editing and deft camera work. I give it zero popped corns.

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